VisitGuano Point

Live life on the edge when you visit Guano Point. One of the most dramatic viewpoints in all the Grand Canyon, this location is anything but a quick stop. Take the “Highpoint Hike” for stunning, 360-degree views of the Grand Canyon and Colorado River. Be sure to watch where you step, because many areas do not have railings. Visit the remnants of a historic tram that once stretched 8,800 feet across the canyon to a guano mine. Dine right on the edge of the canyon at Guano Deli. And peruse Native American jewelry and crafts while interacting with Tribal Members at the Hualapai Market.

 

For more information, please call 1-888-868-WEST or 928-769-2636.

Guano Point

A delicious salad from Guano Deli

Dine on the Edge of the Canyon

There are a precious few places where you can enjoy a great lunch and dazzling views of the Grand Canyon. Guano Deli is one of them. Savor dishes like BBQ shredded beef, baked chicken, salads, and more as you admire the beauty and magnificence of one of the Seven Natural Wonders of the World.

History of Guano Point

In the 1930s, a passing boater discovered a guano cave, and for 20 years after, unsuccessful attempts were made to mine the nitrogen-rich guano for fertilizer. After hearing there was more than 100,000 tons of guano in the cave, the U.S. Guano Corporation bought the property and constructed a $3.5 million tramway system to extract it. The aerial tramway was built from the mine to what is now known as Guano Point, with the cable head-house built on land leased by the Hualapai Tribe. The cableway crossed the river, with a main span of 7,500 feet and a vertical lift of 2,500 feet.

 

In 1959, all the cave’s resources were exhausted, because the original prediction of 100,000 tons was actually closer to 1,000 tons. Shortly after this, a U.S. Air Force fighter jet crashed into the overhead cable system and permanently disabled it. The remaining structures were left intact as a monument to man’s attempt to mine the canyon.

Guano Point area sign